09.09.20

Daines Urges Action on Grizzly Bear Delisting in Senate Committee

Invites FWS Director Skipwith to Montana to Discuss Grizzly Bear Management

U.S. SENATE – U.S. Senator Steve Daines today testified in a U.S. Senate Committee in support of his bill, the Grizzly Bear State Management Act, which would delist the grizzly bear in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, return management to the State of Montana and prevent further obstruction in the courts.

Grizzly Hearing

To download the full video, click HERE

“Wildlife management should be determined by science, not a court order. The science has long proven that the grizzly bear population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem has fully recovered,” Daines said. “Delisting the grizzly bear is in the best interest of our communities, public safety, the ecosystem, wildlife, and the grizzly bear itself. Montana has proven they can conserve and manage the species and it’s time to return management to the state.”   

Grizzly hearing 1

At the hearing, Daines introduced witness and fellow Montanan Chuck Roady who is the Vice President and General Manager of the F.H. Stoltze Land and Lumber Company and the President of the Federal Forest Resource Coalition. At the hearing, Roady spoke in favor of Daines' bill, urging its passage.

Senator Daines also sent a letter inviting U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Aurelia Skipwith to Montana to discuss grizzly bear recovery and management across the state.

The letter states: “Given these new developments and the importance of grizzly bear conservation and management to the state, I would like to invite you to join me in the Golden Triangle Area in Montana this October to see firsthand how grizzly bear populations have rebounded and hear from landowners and wildlife partners on the importance of proper management.”

To read the full letter, click HERE.

Background:

On March 6th, 2020, Daines announced the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) responded to his frequent pleas for better management surrounding grizzly bears and human conflict in Montana. 

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